Centre for EU-Asia Relations

Let us Cordially invite you to the Official Opening of the Centre for EU-Asia Relations.

Publications by the Centre

New book by our Associate Researcher Richard Q. Turcsányi published by prestigious publishing house Springer! It offers an assessment of China’s assertive foreign policy behavior with a special focus on Chinese policies in the South China Sea (SCS). By providing a detailed account of the events in the SCS and by analyzing power dynamics in the region, it identifies the driving forces behind China’s assertive foreign policy. Considering China’s power on a domestic as well as an international level, it examines a number of different sources of hard and soft power, including military, economics, geopolitics, and domestic legitimacy. (Richard Q. Turcsányi)

The relevance of individual Visegrad countries in Beijing’s foreign policyshows significant stereotype: they are traditionally viewed as small countries.This opinion did not vanish despite the declarative importance of 16+1relations and the V4-China cooperative formats on the side of China. Eventhough the V4 countries show the high potential for trade and investmentsamong the 16 Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries, there has beena minimal annual increase of the economic statistics since 2011/2012. (Richard Q. Turcsányi, Tamás MaturaRudolf Fürst)

The Czech Republic’s relations with China generally follow the mainstream, economy-focused approach of other European states, but high-level political ties with Beijing were relatively low profile until only two years ago. The reason for this was China’s reaction to the Czech Republic’s assertive human rights policy, which began after the breakup of the communist regime in 1989. Because the Czech Republic is a small country, which is not important in China’s Europe strategy, and which has already hosted the Dalai Lama eleven times, it has received the kind of cold reception from China that one would expect. (Rudolf Fürst)

The Czech Republic’s bilateral relations with the People’s Republic of China (PRC) recently experienced the biggest improvement within the whole EU 28 since 2013, when pro-China former Prime Minister Miloš Zeman was elected president. From the Czech perspective, this improvement is not directly connected to the Chinese ‘One Belt, One Road’ strategy, or any specific OBOR-related multilateral project. From the Chinese view, however, Czech rhetorical support for OBOR is an important element of bilateral diplomatic dealings, and some of China’s engagement on the ground is framed ‘in OBOR terms’. (Rudolf Fürst)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michal Kouřil
Doctoral Degree Student
kouril@iir.cz

 

 

 

 

 

Jan Hornát
Associate Researcher
janhornat@seznam.cz

 

 

 

 

 





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